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passion-net training blog

By JOHN-PAUL PAGANINI 05 Aug, 2017
You may be looking at your Google Analytics and seeing the following terms appear in your reports such as 'Direct / None' and 'Not set' and wondering - what's that all about?

Google Analytics attributes traffic to 'sources' and 'mediums'. A source identifies the origin of your traffic which could be a search engine such as  Google, or a website domain.

Medium is simply a category for source or if you prefer, categorisation of traffic sources.

Mediums can include  "organic" ie. unpaid search, "cpc" - cost per click ie. paid search, or "referral", and even custom names such as those you have defined in tagging of your email marketing links.

An example of a referral is where a visitor arrives at your site by clicking on a link from another site.

In the case of Direct / None appearing in your Google Analytics, this occurs when no prior data can be found on the user, and when information about the referring website ie. where the traffic comes from cannot be read.

A Google definition of direct traffic is for which the referrer is unknown and for which no prior campaign data could be found for the cookie (user).

In what cases could Direct / None occur?

  • A user types in a url
  • A user clicks on a bookmark
  • A user clicks on a link in an email from Outlook or other
  • A user clicks on a link from a pdf or other type of document
  • A user clicks on a link from a mobile app
  • A user clicks on a link from a secure site to a non-secure site ie. going from https:// to http://
  • A user clicks through via a url shortener
  • A user clicks on a link from some other desktop software
So, we can see there are a range of use-cases where direct / none could be returned in your Google Analytics.

How can we overcome this? There is something we can do and that is tag the links under our ownership. This could be links in email campaigns we send out, links in a marketing brochureware or links on third-party sites. We can use Google URL builder tool to specify attributes which will present as labels for us in our Google Analytics reporting, and in turn, better identify that traffic.

(not set) is a value for a 'keyword' dimension in Google Analytics. This happens where the visitor has missing referrer information, or has arrived via a referring website other than by paid search links in search engine results. The keyword dimension is usually offered in cases of organic and paid search traffic but not for referral or direct traffic traffic.

A useful guide to help troubleshoot (not set) and (not provided) can be found on the Lunametrics blog
http://www.lunametrics.com/blog/2015/06/25/11-places-google-analytics-not-set/
By JOHN-PAUL PAGANINI 20 Jul, 2017
Are you confused by Google Analytics? You've heard it's free to use but don't understand some of the reports, or you just don't trust the data it is presenting? Let passion-net training make sense of Google Analytics for small businesses. Google Analytics is a free analytics application run by Google and available online. You first need to create an account to sign-up for free. Google Analytics is a powerful tool but it's important to define in advance what metrics are important to your business to measure, as well as having a certain level of trust in what the data is telling you. You need to get your Google Analytics implementation right so it's wise to filter out 'internal traffic' from your reports, as well as 'bot traffic' and 'ghost spam' to clean up the data. It's also important to have the tracking code implemented correctly, and implemented in the correct places on your website. It's wise to cultivate a critical sense of the data contained in Google Analytics as you'll find over time through your own use you'll develop a better grasp of its finer points and when to place your trust or otherwise into the data. The sorts of insights you draw from Google Analytics can help you become more efficient with your online marketing spend and online strategy - saving you money, driving leads and delivering better results for your small business. To book a 1-2-1 Google Analytics training session for your small business get in touch or call me on 07540430027.
By JOHN-PAUL PAGANINI 20 Jul, 2017
At some point you may want to track certain custom actions or events on your website using your Google Analytics set-up. A useful and free tool to help you do this is 'Google Tag Manager'. This can be found online, and is a free tool offered by Google. You may wish to use Google Tag Manager to track how many times your document or pdf was downloaded, what specific links were clicked on, or prescribe a value or category to some event along the path to conversion. Google Tag Manager allows you to create these tracking 'tags' for free. Tags are pieces of script or code, typically written in 'javascript' language. Depending on the type of event or action you wish your Google Analytics to track, you can select the appropriate option in Google Tag Manager and go through the steps. Tagging can be a more advanced concept, and technically more demanding to implement - so you actually may want to refer to a website developer to help you do this. passion-net training's Google Analytics course contains a discussion around tagging however actual usage of Google Tag Manager is beyond its scope - as it is more advanced. Once you have created the tag or script / code snippet, this needs to be inserted on the relevant page typically in the <head> section of the html code on the page but first needs testing. In Google Tag Manager, it is possible to preview the tag on your site as if the code had already been appended. In preview mode, you can carry out the desired action on your site to test if the tag will 'fire'. You can also look in the real-time analytics section of Google Analytics to see if the event or action gets recorded. Once satisfied, you can use Google Tag Manager to 'publish' the tag live to your site. Implementing action or event tracking gives you richer information than the standard Google Analytics set-up and can help provide further insight into your most important metrics, and therefore inform your marketing strategy. There are plenty of free developer resources available online if you want to find out more. In the meantime, if you wish to book a 1-day 1-2-1 Google Analytics training course and workshop to help give you the information you need for your online marketing then get in touch or call me on 075404 30027.

passion-net training blog

By JOHN-PAUL PAGANINI 05 Aug, 2017
You may be looking at your Google Analytics and seeing the following terms appear in your reports such as 'Direct / None' and 'Not set' and wondering - what's that all about?

Google Analytics attributes traffic to 'sources' and 'mediums'. A source identifies the origin of your traffic which could be a search engine such as  Google, or a website domain.

Medium is simply a category for source or if you prefer, categorisation of traffic sources.

Mediums can include  "organic" ie. unpaid search, "cpc" - cost per click ie. paid search, or "referral", and even custom names such as those you have defined in tagging of your email marketing links.

An example of a referral is where a visitor arrives at your site by clicking on a link from another site.

In the case of Direct / None appearing in your Google Analytics, this occurs when no prior data can be found on the user, and when information about the referring website ie. where the traffic comes from cannot be read.

A Google definition of direct traffic is for which the referrer is unknown and for which no prior campaign data could be found for the cookie (user).

In what cases could Direct / None occur?

  • A user types in a url
  • A user clicks on a bookmark
  • A user clicks on a link in an email from Outlook or other
  • A user clicks on a link from a pdf or other type of document
  • A user clicks on a link from a mobile app
  • A user clicks on a link from a secure site to a non-secure site ie. going from https:// to http://
  • A user clicks through via a url shortener
  • A user clicks on a link from some other desktop software
So, we can see there are a range of use-cases where direct / none could be returned in your Google Analytics.

How can we overcome this? There is something we can do and that is tag the links under our ownership. This could be links in email campaigns we send out, links in a marketing brochureware or links on third-party sites. We can use Google URL builder tool to specify attributes which will present as labels for us in our Google Analytics reporting, and in turn, better identify that traffic.

(not set) is a value for a 'keyword' dimension in Google Analytics. This happens where the visitor has missing referrer information, or has arrived via a referring website other than by paid search links in search engine results. The keyword dimension is usually offered in cases of organic and paid search traffic but not for referral or direct traffic traffic.

A useful guide to help troubleshoot (not set) and (not provided) can be found on the Lunametrics blog
http://www.lunametrics.com/blog/2015/06/25/11-places-google-analytics-not-set/
By JOHN-PAUL PAGANINI 20 Jul, 2017
Are you confused by Google Analytics? You've heard it's free to use but don't understand some of the reports, or you just don't trust the data it is presenting? Let passion-net training make sense of Google Analytics for small businesses. Google Analytics is a free analytics application run by Google and available online. You first need to create an account to sign-up for free. Google Analytics is a powerful tool but it's important to define in advance what metrics are important to your business to measure, as well as having a certain level of trust in what the data is telling you. You need to get your Google Analytics implementation right so it's wise to filter out 'internal traffic' from your reports, as well as 'bot traffic' and 'ghost spam' to clean up the data. It's also important to have the tracking code implemented correctly, and implemented in the correct places on your website. It's wise to cultivate a critical sense of the data contained in Google Analytics as you'll find over time through your own use you'll develop a better grasp of its finer points and when to place your trust or otherwise into the data. The sorts of insights you draw from Google Analytics can help you become more efficient with your online marketing spend and online strategy - saving you money, driving leads and delivering better results for your small business. To book a 1-2-1 Google Analytics training session for your small business get in touch or call me on 07540430027.
By JOHN-PAUL PAGANINI 20 Jul, 2017
At some point you may want to track certain custom actions or events on your website using your Google Analytics set-up. A useful and free tool to help you do this is 'Google Tag Manager'. This can be found online, and is a free tool offered by Google. You may wish to use Google Tag Manager to track how many times your document or pdf was downloaded, what specific links were clicked on, or prescribe a value or category to some event along the path to conversion. Google Tag Manager allows you to create these tracking 'tags' for free. Tags are pieces of script or code, typically written in 'javascript' language. Depending on the type of event or action you wish your Google Analytics to track, you can select the appropriate option in Google Tag Manager and go through the steps. Tagging can be a more advanced concept, and technically more demanding to implement - so you actually may want to refer to a website developer to help you do this. passion-net training's Google Analytics course contains a discussion around tagging however actual usage of Google Tag Manager is beyond its scope - as it is more advanced. Once you have created the tag or script / code snippet, this needs to be inserted on the relevant page typically in the <head> section of the html code on the page but first needs testing. In Google Tag Manager, it is possible to preview the tag on your site as if the code had already been appended. In preview mode, you can carry out the desired action on your site to test if the tag will 'fire'. You can also look in the real-time analytics section of Google Analytics to see if the event or action gets recorded. Once satisfied, you can use Google Tag Manager to 'publish' the tag live to your site. Implementing action or event tracking gives you richer information than the standard Google Analytics set-up and can help provide further insight into your most important metrics, and therefore inform your marketing strategy. There are plenty of free developer resources available online if you want to find out more. In the meantime, if you wish to book a 1-day 1-2-1 Google Analytics training course and workshop to help give you the information you need for your online marketing then get in touch or call me on 075404 30027.
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